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Stored '83 R100 RS needs some restorative TLC

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Mike Buhler
(@16813)
Posts: 185
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I just got a tip from the guy who will be my new mechanic. He was telling me that the orifices in the master cylinder get clogged so the fluid will not flow back properly. Sounds like that bit of maintenance is pretty simple. The test is to pull a brake pad and squeeze the brakes. Try to push the piston back and if it won't return that tells you it's clogged at the master cylinder. I can totally see this as being the root of my problem.

Now it's just finding the time as I'm not home much with work.

This post was modified 8 months ago by Mike Buhler
 
Posted : 07/08/2023 03:25
Mike Buhler
(@16813)
Posts: 185
Estimable Member
Topic starter
 

I I dug in and cleaned out the master cylinder, there was definitely a bunch of gunk in there. I got it so it was flowing well in both directions and clean. The other thing I noticed was that the bolt that tightens the right hand controls to the bars is broken. I've started drilling it but it's a slow process. I short spin the brakes felt good. I think I'll wait until I order new brake lines before I do a full bleed again.

 
Posted : 07/09/2023 08:41
Mike Buhler
(@16813)
Posts: 185
Estimable Member
Topic starter
 

On a slightly different note I just got the new stator and brushes for my R65 LS so that bike should be back on the road pretty quick too. 

 
Posted : 07/14/2023 22:17
Mike Buhler
(@16813)
Posts: 185
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Ok, now my pretty R100 is on the road and running quite well. I am greatly enjoying it and it looks like it will be a picture car on Son of a Critch the TV show I'm working on. With any luck there will be a drive by and I can be the rider too. I'll put up what network it will be on and the episode. 

I put a Brown's side stand on so now it sits at a sensible lean angle.

A new issue that has come up is related to my signal lights. Sometimes when I switch them on they come on as solid light, no flashing.  The other day I switched them on and got the fast flash and it looked like the rear left signal wasn't on. Then it worked as per normal with all 4 flashing. Anyone have any thoughts?

 
Posted : 09/03/2023 03:19
Richard Whatley
(@wobbly)
Posts: 2499
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Posted by: @16813

A new issue that has come up is related to my signal lights. Sometimes when I switch them ON they come on as solid light, no flashing.  The other day I switched them on and got the fast flash and it looked like the rear left signal wasn't on. Then it worked as per normal with all 4 flashing. Anyone have any thoughts?

Since the lamps work, then we can deduce that the wiring is most likely correct. In this order...

• Remove and test all 4 flasher bulbs.

• When you are ready to re-seat the bulbs, coat each base with an anti-oxidation product, such as No-Ox-Id.

• Replace the flasher unit*, coating all the new flasher terminals as above before installation.

 

*Note: There are 2 types of flasher units, $4 and $25. The cheaper type is what the bike came with and will work fine. The more expensive type is required if you have LED bulbs in your turn signal pods.

 

Hope this helps.

 

This post was modified 6 months ago by Richard Whatley

[color=blue]Don't hide 'em, Ride 'em !!
#15150[/color]

 
Posted : 09/03/2023 04:08
Mike Buhler
(@16813)
Posts: 185
Estimable Member
Topic starter
 

That's an easy one to start with and this bike definitely has nothing LED on it but I wouldn't mind getting some aux lights at some point.

 
Posted : 09/04/2023 03:46
Richard Whatley
(@wobbly)
Posts: 2499
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Posted by: @16813

That's an easy one to start with and this bike definitely has nothing LED on it but I wouldn't mind getting some aux lights at some point.

► The place to start is with an LED headlamp bulb. This is because the headlamp bulb uses more power than any other device on the bike. By going LED you not only get more light at night, you're more easily seen during the day, and you consume less electrical power doing it (up to 5A less). 

Here's a link to a suitable H4 replacement. (The 3-sided columns are far superior to the flat, 2-sided versions.)

Consuming less electrical power unloads the alternator and rectifier so they run cooler. It also allows faster battery charging after using the electric start. And if you add heated grips or other winter attire, that freed-up extra 5A can save you from adding an expensive $350+ aftermarket alternator.

► Simply plugging in LED bulbs in the tail lamp can get you seen from further away. The trick here is to use only RED light LEDs. When you use standard white light bulbs (like you are now), most of the light created does not leave the tail lamp because the red TL lens acts as a filter. So you can quickly and easily turn your standard TL into a blinding red "death ray" in 3 minutes with off the shelf bulbs from the LAPS.

► Using Blue or Green light LEDs in your gauges can greatly soften and reduce nighttime distractions from the gauges.

► Using a Blue LED in your High Beam indicator lamp can help you see your indicator, even in bright sun light. 

► Also consider a Solid State Voltage Regulator for more accurate battery control. Most mechanical OEM VRs are worn out after 40 years. Here's a link.

 

Hope this helps.

 

This post was modified 6 months ago by Richard Whatley

[color=blue]Don't hide 'em, Ride 'em !!
#15150[/color]

 
Posted : 09/04/2023 05:19
Mike Buhler
(@16813)
Posts: 185
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Topic starter
 

Yay, today I was out watching the flicker of the left rear signal not working. A look at the bulb it looked fine. That was all good until the signal lights just quit for no apparent reason. My first thought is always fuses. 

 
Posted : 09/04/2023 14:14
Richard Whatley
(@wobbly)
Posts: 2499
Member
 

Posted by: @16813

Yay, today I was out watching the flicker of the left rear signal not working. A look at the bulb it looked fine. That was all good until the signal lights just quit for no apparent reason. My first thought is always fuses.

 

"My first thought is always fuses." Again, there are only 2 fuses on an Airhead. Thus, each fuse controls MULTIPLE devices. If multiple things didn't stop working at the exact same time, then we can rule out anything having to do with fuses.

"A look at the bulb it looked fine." This is not a beauty pageant or TikTok, so "looks" don't count for much. Did you happen to test the bulb while you had it out? Did you happen to apply an electrical anti-oxidation compound to the bulb's base before re-installing it?

I have already given you a 3-step repair process, which you have apparently given up on half-way through. I believe you were also linked to a turn signal system schematic as well. There is nothing complicated about a 1970-era turn signal system. There are only 5 components, 4 of which are light bulbs. You should be able to sort the entire system inside 15 minutes. 

I have high hopes that you will get this bike back on the road and running reliably. But to do that you'll need to develop some logical thinking and analytical skills. If you are stumbling on the simplest system on the bike, what will happen when you have charging or handling issues? 

All the best

This post was modified 6 months ago by Richard Whatley

[color=blue]Don't hide 'em, Ride 'em !!
#15150[/color]

 
Posted : 09/05/2023 07:48
Mike Buhler
(@16813)
Posts: 185
Estimable Member
Topic starter
 

I did check the bulb for continuity and I swapped it with the front just to be sure. I pulled the tank to have a look at all of the wiring that is accessible and no obvious issues. I put dielectric grease on the only connector I could reach. We did a test with my multi meter to compare voltage between the left and right sides and there is definitely less going to the left side so my guess is that's why it's not working correctly. No obvious chafed wires etc. The voltmeter had been wired by a previous owner who left the clock disconnected. I know the signal lights, clock and voltmeter all go to the same separate wiring harness so I think the issue might be in there. I do have one on order but as of my last check it's still back ordered. 

I may not necessarily analyze in the most obvious ways to some but I work along in the way my brain works, I generally get to the issue. Maybe not as quick as others but I usually get there. Electrics are my biggest weakness but I am getting better. 

I missed your bit about the flasher unit. I don't even know exactly what that is? Where is it and what does it look like? If my voltage is low putting an LED flasher bulb in may  still work with slightly lowered voltage. 

From the link you put up for the replacement headlight looking at more online the 9003 is the model I need?

 
Posted : 09/06/2023 07:01
Richard Whatley
(@wobbly)
Posts: 2499
Member
 

?1

 

From the link you put up for the replacement headlight looking at more online the 9003 is the model I need?

The stock 1983 R100 used an H4 bulb. Since you have supplied no photos, what bulb your bike uses is for you to discover. The link supplied will work fine in an unaltered 1983 R100. 

 

I missed your bit about the flasher unit. I don't even know exactly what that is? Where is it and what does it look like?

In a stock 1983 R100, the flasher unit is in a can (which is typically rectangular or cylindrical in physical shape) which will have only 2 or 3 terminals. On a stock 1983 R100 this unit is located on the RH side (twistgrip side) inside the headlamp shell. Put your finger on it and you should feel it click with the pulsing flasher. I suggest you Google "1983 flasher unit" for an image.

 

If my voltage is low putting an LED flasher bulb in may still work with slightly lowered voltage.

No, for 2 reasons. 1. LEDs work on a much narrower range of voltages than incandescent bulbs. You can prove this to yourself by installing an LED ceiling lamp in a socket controlled by a standard incandescent wall dimmer. 2. Older $4 flasher units use a switch controlled by a bimetal strip. Thus, the flasher requires a certain total resistance in the circuit in order to perfectly heat the bimetal. That resistance is supplied by 2 standardized incandescent turn signal bulbs. LED bulbs work a completely different way. So they may illuminate, but will not allow the flasher unit to pulse since the LEDs have the incorrect internal resistance. 

PS. You will note that of all the LED bulbs listed in my previous post, using LED bulbs in the turn signal is conspicuously absent. 

 

This is all basic 1980's automotive technology. I don't want to discourage you, but there is a minimum level of understanding required to operate and repair a vehicle of this age. I would suggest lots of reading and maybe some night school classes to help you fill in the gaps.

This post was modified 6 months ago 4 times by Richard Whatley

[color=blue]Don't hide 'em, Ride 'em !!
#15150[/color]

 
Posted : 09/07/2023 13:01
Mike Buhler
(@16813)
Posts: 185
Estimable Member
Topic starter
 

Ok, that's some solid info to work on. Thanks

 
Posted : 09/08/2023 11:24
Steven Rankin
(@14724)
Posts: 145
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I beg to differ on the comment three sided LED headlight replacement bulbs plug in and work better than two sided.   I have tried a number of different bulbs before coming across this fine video which explains pretty well why some LED bulbs won't perform as well as the H4 bulb they are to replace.  

I write this with the notion that anytime an LED bulb is replaced for the standard H4 bulb it is for daytime running only and that the bike will not be ridden after dark.  

Some H4 LED replacement bulbs are so messed up with night time beam patter and are dangerous or blinding to oncoming traffic.  

After a drawer full of LED hopeful bulbs I finally found one that might if I happened to get caught out after dark produce a decent beam pattern without blinding other drivers.

 

 

Beware! I do not suffer fools gladly! St.

 
Posted : 09/08/2023 12:08
Steven Rankin
(@14724)
Posts: 145
Estimable Member
 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nnD_sDWNjEw

Beware! I do not suffer fools gladly! St.

 
Posted : 09/08/2023 12:08
Steven Rankin
(@14724)
Posts: 145
Estimable Member
 

Mike, where are you located?  LOL, if close I would be willing to stop and give a hand or have you come to my shop and see what we can sort out. St.

Beware! I do not suffer fools gladly! St.

 
Posted : 09/08/2023 12:30
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